Home Features Community All options for voting in June’s primary election explained

All options for voting in June’s primary election explained

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Primary elections this year are a bit tough to understand, admits County Clerk Auditor Stacy Clark, when the Democratic Party has an open primary election and the Republican Party has a closed primary election.  Clark is quick to point out that the parties, not the county, set the rules for which registered voters can participate in their primary elections.

Here’s the scoop:

One vote:  You can only cast one ballot, so choose wisely. The county will track whether or not you have cast your ballot, and will not allow you to cast a second one.

Democrats:  The Democratic Party will allow anyone to vote in their primary ballot, even registered Republicans, through June 28.  If you are a registered Democrat, you will receive your primary ballot in the mail to vote on a U.S. Senator (choosing between Democrats Misty K. Snow and Jonathan Swinton).  If you live in District 3, you will also vote on a nonpartisan local school board member (choosing among Gaylene Adams, Jennie Earl and R. Kraig Walker).

Unaffiliated:  If you have not registered with any political party, you will not receive a ballot at all, for either Democratic or Republican parties.  However, if you are unaffiliated and live in District 3, you will be sent a primary ballot in the mail so you can vote on a local nonpartisan school board member (choosing among Gaylene Adams, Jennie Earl and R. Kraig Walker).

You can vote as an unaffiliated voter in the Democratic Party primary election.  You will have to request a Democratic ballot from the county clerk up through June 28 to vote on a U.S. Senator (choosing between Democrats Misty K. Snow and Jonathan Swinton).

If you were unaffiliated with any party as of May 31, you can join the Republican Party up through June 28 and still be allowed to vote in the Republican Party primary election in order to vote on the governor (choosing between Republicans Gary Herbert and Jonathan Johnson) and State House of Representatives (choosing between Republicans Mel Brown and local Logan Wilde).

Republicans:  If you are a registered Republican (by May 31), you will receive your primary ballot in the mail.  You will be voting on the governor (choosing between Republicans Gary Herbert and Jonathan Johnson) and State House of Representatives (choosing between Republicans Mel Brown and local Logan Wilde). If you live in District 3, you will also vote on a local nonpartisan school board member (choosing among Gaylene Adams, Jennie Earl and R. Kraig Walker).

If you are a registered Republican, you can choose to surrender your mailed ballot and participate instead in the open Democratic Party primary election in order to vote on a U.S. Senator (choosing between Democrats Misty K. Snow and Jonathan Swinton).  You will have to request a Democratic ballot from the county clerk to do so and will not be allowed to also vote in the Republican primary.

If you are a registered Republican who chooses to participate in the Democratic Party primary election instead, and live in District 3, you would still be allowed to vote on a local nonpartisan school board member.

Other parties:  If you are registered in a party other than the Republican or Democratic, you cannot vote in the Republican Party primary election.  If you had changed your party affiliation to Republican before May 31, you would be allowed to vote in the Republican primary.

However, you are still allowed to vote in the Democratic Party primary election through June 28, voting on a U.S. Senator (choosing between Democrats Misty K. Snow and Jonathan Swinton) without having to change your affiliation.  You must request a Democratic ballot from the county clerk.

If you live in District 3, you should have received a ballot in the mail to vote on a local nonpartisan school board member (choosing among Gaylene Adams, Jennie Earl and R. Kraig Walker).

Mail postmark deadline:  For all voters casting ballots by mail, make sure to have your postmark read June 27.  For those who would like to physically deliver their ballot rather than cast it by mail, they can do so at the only physical receptacle at the county offices any day during regular business hours through June 28.

Primary Election Day:  On June 28, any registered voter can vote in person using county machines at the county offices.  This will be the only location and only day for using voting machines in the county.

For more information:  Please visit vote.utah.gov for a wealth of individually specific information.  It will help if you are unsure of what party you are affiliated with, what district you live in, if your voter status is active, your polling location, what candidates you can vote on, and who your current elected officials are.  On this website, you can also read candidate biographies.  You can find that information easily at vote.utah.gov or call the county clerk at (801) 845-4011.

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