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Eagle Scout project benefits park guests

Article Date: 
14 September, 2012 (All day)

Move over Amazon and Barnes and Noble, the “Little Free Library” has come to town. Bringing to Morgan a relatively new concept in sharing literature, River Pinhey designed and built Riverside Park’s latest addition. River Pinhey is the 14-year-old son of Bambi and Scott Pinhey, and grandson of Earl and Julie Anderson. 
While thinking of Eagle Scout project ideas, River decided he wanted to do something for the city so he turned to Shelly Betz, Morgan City councilwoman, for ideas. Recently, Shelly heard of a project she thought would be perfect for the citizens of Morgan. This project, named “Little Free Library,” was started only three years ago in Madison, Wisconsin, and has now grown into a worldwide endeavor. The concept is to have a container that makes books available in the park where people can take a book, leave a book or just purely enjoy one while they are there. Not only does this project promote literacy and a love of reading, but as the mission statement of “Little Free Library” states, it also helps to “build a sense of community as we share skills, creativity, and wisdom across generations.”
River loved this idea and started his own research on July 10. After presenting his idea to the city council he got the go ahead and began figuring out what materials he would need. With guidance from his uncle, John Heywood, he constructed the “library” and with help from his troop (Troop 971), it was installed on September 5. Throughout the project, River learned that he really enjoyed serving the public and his favorite part was actually building the box. During his time in scouting he has really enjoyed earning the different merit badges, stating that he feels that it has prepared him for the rest of his life by teaching him many different skills. We are grateful for the dedication and hard work River has shown and invite all to come check it out.
For those wanting to learn more about the “Little Free Library” project, or to find locations of “Little Free Libraries” across the world, check out LittleFreeLibrary.org.